Et tu, Brute?

He was betrayed. All this time he had trustelegos smalld her, and all this time she had been there for him. But now…

Et tu, Brute?” he asked through tear-filled eyes. “Even you, mother, would betray me?”

He threw his body around wildly. The strength of her arms, however, as she pinned him down was uncanny. He cried out, but onlookers hardly glanced as they passed by. It was hopeless.

“It’s okay,” she said soothingly, but he saw past her façade.

Out of the corner of his eye her fingers edged toward the black bag. She unzipped it, dug inside. Then there it was—the cloth of ice cold death—in her palm.

He gave one final scream, arched his back with all his might, and kicked with a force that could take down a fleet of Lego soldiers. Still, the game was up.

His diaper would be changed.


My twins are a whopping 6 months, and since the moment they entered the world they have eyed me with suspicion. Sure, they love me and all that, but every 10 minutes or so they make a point—via screaming—to inform me that I’m doing this mom thing all wrong.

Don’t try to put me in that contraption (ie car seat). I insist I ride in your arms instead.

Let me have that shiny thing (ie knife)! Selfish girl, you’re just trying to keep it for yourself!


So often my twins’ inability to understand the world, claim to understand it, and fight against me and my better knowledge makes my task harder. The short of it? Because I love them I deal with their insistent thrashing. Because I love them I end up with poop on my hands.

And then I wonder: how much poop does God have on His hands for me?

 Yancey states,

“Queen Elizabeth II had recently visited the United States, and reporters delighted in spelling out the logistics involved: her four thousand pounds of luggage included two outfits for every occasion, a mourning outfit in case someone died, forty pints of plasma, and white kid leather toilet seat covers… In meek contrast, God’s visit to earth took place in an animal shelter with no attendants present and nowhere to lay the newborn king but a feed trough. Indeed, the event that divided history, and even our calendars, into two parts may have had more animal than human witnesses. A mule could have stepped on him.”

All the Israelites were waiting for their idea of a perfect Messiah: a wealthy, powerful Jewish king who would swoop down and destroy their oppressors (the Romans). But Jesus, poor insignificant Jesus, threw them for a huge loop. And wasn’t it the best plan of all?


Thank God that He so patiently sticks with us through our whining,

adolescent thrashing, brazen accusing,

and puffed up questioning.

Simply because He loves us.


Trust in the Lord with all your heart

And lean not on your own understanding;

In all your ways submit to him,

And he will make your paths straight.

Proverbs 3:5


Check it out!

Daily Reading: Proverbs 3

Bible in a Year: Jeremiah 20-21; 2 Timothy 4


Reference: P37, The Jesus I Never Knew, Phillip Yancey.



Magic School Bus Days

old-school-bus-1431364-1599x1066Ms. Frizzle was transporting a school bus of kids into a digestive tract on TV as I pursed my lips, squeezed my eyes shut, and put the ruler to the top of my head. Careful not to move my hand up or down one millimeter, my pencil scratched against the door frame. Quickly I turned to see. Nope. I dropped the ruler and got into bed. I had not grown shorter.

Yes, for a brief time—spurred by my middle school love interest in a boy 1 foot shorter than me—I prayed nightly that God would make me shorter.

I am tall. Really tall. And in sixth grade, I was about the same height I am now (6 feet), which meant I was lucky enough to be the giant in braces, wearing large purple glasses, walking around with jeans four inches too short that sagged against my skeleton frame.

It was bad enough that my 7th grade teacher pulled me aside out of the blue one day to say, “Don’t worry. One day boys will be taller than you.” I was that awkward.

Oh, and it didn’t help that all my best friends happened to be gorgeous.

But Hebrews 13:5 says, “Stay away from the love of money; be satisfied with what you have. For God has said, ‘I will never, never fail you nor forsake you.’’”

Life is chock-full of things we want to be or have. We are nearing the Christmas season and guaranteed there are going to be people walking around December 26th in beautiful new Nikes, pea coats with oh-so-chic collars that’d make me feel like Sherlock Holmes or a New York model, shiny new Apple watches that, again, makes one feel like Sherlock Holmes of the future… you get the point.

Instead of trying to brainwash myself not to think about all the pretty things I want or wish I could be, I find it essential to read and reread the second part of Hebrews 13:5. We can be content with everything in our lives because and truly because God has said, “Never will I leave you; never will I forsake you.”

If God—you know, only the greatest most important Being in the universe—wants to create me and have a relationship with me and promises not to abandon me no matter how selfish and annoying and boring and immature I am, why not be satisfied?

Being with God—now and forever after—is much more exciting than a pair of shoes.


Check it out!

Daily Reading: Hebrews 13

Bible in a Year: Jeremiah 1-2; 1 Timothy 3


Let’s Discuss:

  1. What do you wish you had? What do you wish was different about yourself?
  2. If you had what you wanted, what else do you think you might want? And if you had that too, what else would you want? Do you think you could ever have enough that you’d be totally content?

Write a comment below if you like! I’d love to reply:)